Case Studies

     Embedded Applications
           
Touchy Robot
           
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Detecting Breast Cancer
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Pulse Watch

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     Ergonomics & Grasp Measurements
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            TactileHead Pressure Measurement






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 PPS sensors in Twendy One's robotic hands

Robot-led Armageddon Thwarted by PPS Tactile Sensor Technology


Twendy One's robotic hands details Sensor:
link to 3D molded page
3D Molded

Only five feet tall, but very powerful, weighing in at 245 pounds with man-crushing arms, Twendy-One may have powerful cybernetic muscles, but thanks to PPS’s sensor technology, this robot is as gentle as she is strong.

The human symbiotic robot built by mechanical engineers from Waseda Univeresity in Japan has soft hands and fingers that gently grip with enough strength to lift humans  and interact with subtle movements that respond to human touch.  She can pick up a loaf of bread without crushing it, serve toast and even crack open an egg.  The dexterity and “gentle touch” can be attributed to the 241 sensors which are located on each of Twendy-One’s hands.

She is strong, intelligent and agile, but what makes Twendy-One so unique is the PPS sensor technology that has given her the ability to feel, making her an ideal robot to care for our handicapped and aging population.  When other intelligent machines decide to rise up against their human oppressors, Twendy-One will only be able to use her powers for the good of humanity.

Check out the following video clip to see this in action:
 






Client: WASEDA University Sugano Laboratory